peggyosterkamp

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  • in reply to: Loom Weights #21740
    peggyosterkamp
    Keymaster

    Nancy Wheeler adds with her photos: “Our guild in northern WI got this loom when a local weaver from Chicogo, passed away . We don’t know how whe happened upon it.”


    “Here is a picture of the original weight for my  Ahrens loom next to the one we made to replace the missing ones. I wrapped the new rod in electrician’s tape so it wou ldn’t make so much noise clinking against the otheres.”

    “I have also attached, just FYI some pictures of my  Ahrens loom, in case it gives y ou a hint as to the age…”

    Does anyone know when Jim Ahrens stopped using weights on the shafts so Nancy can date this gorgeous and wonderful loom?

    in reply to: Tell us about your loom! #623
    peggyosterkamp
    Keymaster

    I know this loom and can help you out. Please email me and we can correspond. Sorry not to answer you sooner. Peggy @peggyosterkamp.com">peggy@peggyosterkamp.com

    in reply to: Tell us about your loom! #574
    peggyosterkamp
    Keymaster

    Amazing and wonderful.
    Peggy

    in reply to: Tell us about your loom! #572
    peggyosterkamp
    Keymaster

    What wonderful news! much better than building one from scratch and you know it will work, besides. You can use as many of the shafts as you like when weaving, too. Please do keep us posted and send photos. How did you find out about it??
    Peggy

    in reply to: Looking For Loom #566
    peggyosterkamp
    Keymaster

    A woman in Berkeley is selling two unique looms.

    Loom #1 is a 20-shaft mechanical dobby loom, 40″ weaving width – the
    first dobby loom Jim Ahrens ever made. (Jim Ahrens was the “A” in
    “AVL” – an amazing loom builder/engineer.)

    Loom #2 is a 90%-complete dobby drawloom, 30″ wide with 20 shafts,
    also designed and made by Jim Ahrens. The loom is complete except for
    the beater, a warp beam, and a few other pieces. It comes with
    detailed plans, so a decent woodworker should have no trouble putting
    together the other pieces.

    The owner needs to clear out both looms by April 16 – so she says,
    “Just make me an offer! Any offer!” After that the looms will be cut
    up for the wood (her husband is a woodworker), which seems a real pity
    considering their unique nature and history.

    If you want more information, feel free to email me (I have some
    photos she sent) or else contact her directly at
    1gingerdragon@gmail.com .

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    in reply to: 2-beam loom adjustments #565
    peggyosterkamp
    Keymaster

    I’ll answer the last question first. when you fold up the loom you raise the back beam and when you raise the front beam the back beam lowers, right? So adjust by pushing the front beam down as the cloth beam gets bigger.The same principle when the warp beam is fat–lower it by raising the front beam a bit. Jim never expected a huge roll of cloth on the front beam–expected one to cut off the cloth in pieces as you go. So fiddle with the heights by slightly folding or unfolding your loom–raising and lowering the beams. does this make sense?
    Re: the shuttle race. When the warp is at rest I can’t be sure if it is perfectly horizontal from beam to beam. I’m not at the studio so I can’t be sure. The principle that Jim taught me was it should be slightly lower in the heddles and that the warp would be in the tops of the heddle eyes. What I do, if it’s too high over the shuttle race, I use the folding feature to get it onto the race–lower the front beam. If the top of the shed is not clean, I then raise the offending shafts. That being said, my shafts were already in place so I never set them at a height in the first place. So, I’m thinking the warp would be horizontal except for a dip at the shafts so it is at the level of the tops of the heddle eyes. I think hang the shafts with enough extra cord for adjusting. Does this help? Let me know if you need more info.
    Use Jim’s adjustable knot on the cords to the tops of the shafts–then you can adjust as needed. It’s in the PDF of my book, Warping Your Loom & tying On New Warps. In that book see the chapter on loom geometry and adjusting looms. You can order it from my website and download it.
    Peggy

    in reply to: Collapsing loom #509
    peggyosterkamp
    Keymaster

    Check the FAQ page for a picture of what I do–add a clamp onto the handle for more leverage.

    in reply to: Tell us about your loom! #507
    peggyosterkamp
    Keymaster

    I have a 10-shaft side tie up, 3-beam loom in birds eye maple and live in the San Francisco Bay Area. I have a 4-shaft folding loom in birds eye maple. I have a 40=shaft dobby loom plus 4 shafts. And, finally, I have a loom Jim built in the 70’s with an over head structure made in douglas fir wood. All my looms are Ahrens looms–I have 4! –Peggy

    in reply to: Test topic #403
    peggyosterkamp
    Keymaster

    Test image upload!

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